Alpine Summit

Friday, December 29, 2006

Great Issue

So I went out and bought the latest issue of Maxim because it featured my American Idol: Lacey Chabert. She's been out of the spotlight for quite a while and can be seen in her latest movie: "Black Christmas." A movie that gets reviews like this.

The acting is not bad enough, for the most part, and that's to the determent of the film. The fact that the gals in the victim pool have so much experience as child stars make Mann and Friss look horrible by comparison.

When your acting is the only good thing to say about a film and it turns out to make the film worse, you can be fairly sure you haven't put out a top-quality product. Anyway, the magazine itself is a really good issue if you like "man news" and you should get it.

Anyway, Christopher Hitchens had a great column a few pages after the Lacey spread that I thought was very interesting. He tends to overstate the problem, but is very articulate when he opines about the sorry legal state of America these days.

The anecdote goes that, being an older gentleman with a "salt and pepper beard," Hitchens was outraged that he would be carded by the bartender. It turns out that another older gentleman filed an age discrimination complaint against the bar because HE wasn't being carded. Of course, he won the case. So now, as is often the case these days, something NOBODY had a problem with for years before, and something that might actually make people feel better about growing older, has been ruined by one person. Hitchens does mention that it isn't just the crotchety old man's fault though.

This situation, as with many other situations like this, are the fault of not just the judge but also the trial lawyer who prosecuted the case. This is exactly the sort of think John Edwards has done in his life and is part of the reason he is building a $3 Million dollar house. Remember that the next time he starts talking about "Two Americas" because he is most assuredly in the "haves" category.

|

Thursday, December 28, 2006

When Parents are Deployed

I was flipping through channels tonight and saw Cuba Gooding, Jr. walking down Sesame Street. It turns out this program was on PBS and featured families coping with being away from loved ones who are deployed in the military.

A program was recently implemented to help explain to children 5 and under about their parents situation and to help them understand the situation in which they find themselves. Having experienced this particular situation myself, I can attest to how difficult it is growing up as a child of a parent in the military. This program brought back several memories for me growing up during the waning years of the cold war. Many of us wear the title of "military brat" with pride. Just as working in the military is different from working in the civilian world, so it is for the families.

We often hear "thank a vet" or "be sure to thank someone you know in the military" but people tend to overlook the sacrifices and efforts made by families. Sometimes the spouse takes on the extra duties of the service member such as taking complaints and briefing them later in the evening or playing the role of both parents all the while trying to hold it together themselves. The most amazing part is that even though they have every right to throw up their hands and say "this isn't fair," often their response is "I can't let them see me cry or it might upset them."
If that kind of strength isn't worthy of praise, I don't know what is.

|

Friday, December 22, 2006

Holiday Traffic is a Nightmare!

I just took a quick trip up to Washington, DC (or so I thought) and left at about 2:30. It took me about 2.5 hours to get to DC which is about par for the trip time my GPS was telling me. On the way BACK to Colonial Heights, I left a little after 5 and just now got back at 9:05. The trip is 130 miles and should not have taken that long. Luckily I had nowhere to be tonight so it wasn't a big deal that it took me two hours to go 30 miles. That doesn't mean it was any less of a hassle, though. Ugh. Not only was the traffic just absolutely ridiculous, it rained the entire way up and back.

Now I'm chillaxin' in the hotel drinking a beer and waiting for my dinner. Oh yeah, I haven't eaten since noon. Forgot to mention that little detail.

The reason I had to go up for a "quick" trip was to give original documents to the car dealership where I bought my new car to get it registered in Virginia and hence, plated so I won't have temp tags. It turns out that what I thought was a hassle, might actually save me money. When I transferred my insurance over to Virginia from Colorado, my rate quote went down by almost $100/6 months! In addition, I only have to pay some ownership tax instead of all these socialist fees required by the state because I'm military. So that was a pretty sweet deal.

Anyway, I'm going to eat my dinner and go to bed because I need rest.

On an unrelated note, you wouldn't believe all the leftist bumper stickers I saw. It seemed like every other car had a rainbow in the shape of any host of images (i.e. butterflies), or Kerry Edwards stickers, or "I love my country but I fear my government" stickers." I reminded me I should probably get a "U.S. Army sticker for my new car, but I might get run off the road being so close to all these liberals.

|

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Comedy Central's Comedy

I was watching Comedy Central and saw an ad for a "let's make fun of Christianity" day (called "Sacrilicious Sunday). The day will feature the movies of "Dogma," "40 Days and 40 Nights," and "Superstar: Dare to Dream." I noticed the common theme in each of these "let's make fun of religion" movies is that the only religion being mocked is Christianity. After all, what better way to observed the sanctity of a Christian holiday than by showing films mocking Christianity?

Why is it that Comedy Central is more than happy to mock Christianity for the sake of ratings, but refuses to show a non-offensive depiction of Islam's prophet Mohammed? Does anybody remember this?



What was shown on TV versus what was created by Matt Stone and Trey Parker.

So, out of respect for Islam, CC refuses to show a simple construction paper cutout of Mohammed handing a salmon helmet to Peter Griffin. Where is that respect for Christianity?

Also, why is it that devout Christians who get offended at the drop of a hat are just crazy fundies to be mocked as being "unenlightened" and "straight arrow" while devout Muslims are to be respected and accomodated at every turn? Perhaps it has to do with this?

You may want to think about that the next time Comedy Central decides to have a fun-loving mockfest of Christianity and refuses to mock Islam's violent adherents.

|

Tuesday, December 19, 2006

Pieces in Our Time

I just HAD to post this video from youtube. I don't care who you are, this is funny.

|

KPax A Biblical Allegory?

I was watching "KPax" the other day and while I saw this theme over and over again, one particular scene sticks out illustrating disbelief in spite of overwhelming evidence to the extraordinary.

In KPax, Prot (Kevin Spacey) inhabits the body of a convalescent man for the sake of doing research for his planet: KPax. The "tour guide" for Prot is a psychiatrist played by Jeff Bridges who has been assigned to figure out why Kevin Spacey's character thinks he's an alien from a different planet.

To the movie watcher keeping score, the evidence for Prot's claim is always affirmed. The situation is that Jeff Bridges character (Dr. Mark Powell) presents his new found evidence to others who then come up with an explanation why or how Prot could do certain things.

This brings me to the scene that sticks out most in my mind: the scene at the planetarium. With several of Dr. Powell's astronomer friends looking on, Prot proceeds to solve an astronomical riddle regarding his home system to the amazement of all the scientists in the room.

To me, this seems like almost 100% proof that this guy might just be who he says he is (which is the question a viewer asks themselves over and over again during the movie). However, even with this intimate knowledge of a distant and little-known star system, people still think the man is just crazy and can't accept that he may in fact be an alien doing research on Earth.

This reminded me of the doubting people have of Jesus and His miracles. Despite all of Jesus' signs and fulfillment of prophecies, people still doubted him to be the messiah. At the heart of this is the "prove it" claim that if someone was really (x) then they would be able to do (y). I was reminded of the story of the rich man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31)

"There was a rich man who was dressed in purple and fine linen and lived in luxury every day. At his gate was laid a beggar named Lazarus, covered with sores and longing to eat what fell from the rich man's table. Even the dogs came and licked his sores.

"The time came when the beggar died and the angels carried him to Abraham's side. The rich man also died and was buried. In hell,[a] where he was in torment, he looked up and saw Abraham far away, with Lazarus by his side. So he called to him, 'Father Abraham, have pity on me and send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue, because I am in agony in this fire.'

"But Abraham replied, 'Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, while Lazarus received bad things, but now he is comforted here and you are in agony. And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been fixed, so that those who want to go from here to you cannot, nor can anyone cross over from there to us.'

"He answered, 'Then I beg you, father, send Lazarus to my father's house, for I have five brothers. Let him warn them, so that they will not also come to this place of torment.'

"Abraham replied, 'They have Moses and the Prophets; let them listen to them.'

" 'No, father Abraham,' he said, 'but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.'

"He said to him, 'If they do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.' "


It's interesting that even though we have been told, and even though we have seen, we still doubt. To me it has to be because on some level, we don't want to believe these things because they challenge our own "business as usual" attitudes about the world. We get so used to seeing one thing a certain way that we start to believe that it's the only way we can see that thing. For example, we always see things thrown into the sky fall back down to earth that we can't believe it when someone tells us they just flew around in the air in a new contraption called an airplane. Even after we've seen it, we start thinking: "there has to be some kind of trick behind it--I'm being deceived."

Eventually we learn to accept the new worldview and move on to our next disbelief. Was Prot an alien, or was Kevin Spacey's character relapsed from a waking coma for a short period of time to ultimately tell someone about how he became a vegetable. This is the ultimate question in the movie. Our disbelief can sometimes make us miss the quality of whatever amazing thing is going on as a result of this amazing event we find ourselves questioning. While Jesus' existence and claims to messiah-ship are denigrated, shouted down, mocked and denied, those same people are missing out on His salvation and love. Few should disagree that Jesus' teachings have done more for humanity as a result of His three year ministry than others who have spent lifetimes improving mankind. Perhaps that's something to think about.

|

Monday, December 18, 2006

Socialized Medicine is Bad for Everyone

I saw this video blog about yet another victim of the one payer medical care system in Canada. Touted by people like Michael Moore and Hillary Clinton as being more compassionate, the reality of socialized (government run) medical care is far from that claim.

Enter Mr. Lindsay McCreith; an Ontario resident who had a malignant, cancerous brain tumor. Luckily he was able to get the surgery he needed--in the U.S. As the video shows in Mr. McCreith's own words in conjunction with his wife, the Canadian government was telling them to wait for 4 months just to get an MRI. That was the first round.

After contacting a medical broker, the McCreith's were able to get an appointment--and were seen-- in 24 hours. Next came the surgery. The MRI showed a growth in Mr. McCreith's brain and the Canadian government was again telling him to wait for his life-saving surgery. How long? Three months this time.

Under Canadian law, you are not allowed to pay for your health care. You MUST go through the government. Luckily for Mr. McCreith, he left his country and got much better health care. Sure he had to pay for it, but at least he got it in time; which is the whole point behind semi-capitalist medical care.

Luckily for Mr. McCreith, his wife's father had just passed away and they had the money to afford this EEEVIL KKKAPITALIST form of health care. I can't help but wonder what dubious circumstances under which her father died.

My question is how can such insanity be allowed to continue under a government that claims to be looking out for its citizens? To me, this just seems like a veiled attempt at population control under the guise of helping people. Of course who will be spearheading efforts for socialized medicine here in the U.S.? Why, none other than Sen. Clinton and company. Perhaps we should question the motive behind Sen. Clintons obviously hateful-towards-people-with-money plan. When you hear liberals on the TV talking about how much good socialized medicine will do for people in this country, remember Mr. McCreath.

|

Sunday, December 10, 2006

Global Warming... the fault of Humans?

So according to the UN, 18 percent of greenhouse gasses are produced by livestock. I find this interesting for two reasons; first, environmentalists will most likely include this in their numbers when talking about how much man contributes to the problem just for the sake of getting the number past 2% to sound more dire. Second, the vegitarians and PETArds are probably going to jump on this report to say "see? we told you beef was bad!" and promptly add the greenhouse gas bulletpoint to its "2/3 of all wheat production is used to produce beef" statistic they enjoy pulling out all the time (as if using that much wheat to make meat was a bad thing).

Oak Leaf's challenge is to have lawmakers regulate livestock. A dangerous challenge to give lawmakers because as they say: where there's a will, there's a way. Most likely the communist/socialist lawmakers will simply say "farmers with (x) acres of land are only allowed to have (y) number of livestock. Thus making the price of meat skyrocket and further hinder our economy. One might even think this is the motivation behind the report to begin with given the track record of the UN. They are simply giving governments an excuse to force people into being vegitarians. Not that I'm a conspiracy theorist or anything, but this doesn't seem too far off from the organization that brought us the (in)famous human rights council which continually decrys America as being oppressive.

|

Monday, December 04, 2006

Supremely Awesome

So the Supreme Court is hearing a case about race-based "integration" programs schools are trying to institute to ensure that there are mixed races in schools.

The conservatives on the court rightly point out that acceptance or rejection of someone based on the color of their skin is unconstitutional. The liberals on the court say that it is important for schools to be able to do this because it's hard to ensure mixed races otherwise and can't comply with affirmative action without citing race as a way to accept or deny enrollment to students.

Well gee, perhaps that tells us something about affirmative action then? Oh no! Not at all. Isn't it odd that judging the eligibility on a student's enrollment based on race is being defended by liberals? I thought us conservatives were the racists. Hmm.

|